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Nanometer-scale features onmicrometer-scale surface texturing: A bone histological, gene expression, and nano mechanical study

 

 

Bone, Issue 65, Aug. 2014. Bone (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2014.05.004

Article History: Micro- and nanoscale surface modifications have been the focus of multiple studies in the pursuit of accelerating 24bone apposition or osseointegration at the implant surface. Here, we evaluated histological and nanomechanical 25properties, and gene expression, for a microblasted surface presenting nanometer-scale texture within a 26micrometer-scale texture (MB) (Ossean Surface, Intra-Lock International, Boca Raton, FL) versus a dual-acid 27etched surface presenting texture at the micrometer-scale only (AA), in a rodent femur model for 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks in vivo.

 

Following animal sacrifice, samples were evaluated in terms of histomorphometry, biomechanical29 properties through nanoindentation, and gene expression by real-time quantitative reverse transcription 30polymerase chain reaction analysis. Although the histomorphometric, and gene expression analysis results 31were not significantly different between MB and AA at 4 and 8 weeks, significant differences were seen at 1 32and 2 weeks.

 

The expression of the genes encoding collagen type I (COL-1), and osteopontin (OPN) was significantly33 higher for MB than for AA at 1 week, indicating up-regulated osteoprogenitor and osteoblast differentiation34. At 2 weeks, significantly up-regulated expression of the genes for COL-1, runt-related transcription factor 2 35(RUNX-2), osterix, and osteocalcin (OCN) indicated progressive mineralization in newly formed bone.

 

The nanomechanical36 properties tested by the nanoindentation presented significantly higher-rank hardness and elastic 37modulus for the MB compared to AA at all time points tested. In conclusion, the nanotopographical featured 38surfaces presented an overall higher host-to-implant response compared to the microtextured only surfaces.

 

39The statistical differences observed in some of the osteogenic gene expression between the two groups may 40shed some insight into the role of surface texture and its extent in the observed bone healing mechanisms. 4142 © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

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Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 dental implant surfaces. Part 1: description of the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS) codification system.

 

Abstract

 

Dental implants are commonly used in dental therapeutics, but dental practitioners only have limited information about the characteristics of the implant materials they take the responsibility to place in their patients. Manufacturers, scientists and administrations are also lacking of a consensual and clear method and terminology to characterize and control implant surfaces.

 

The objective of this series of 5 articles is to define and describe the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS) system for the chemical and morphological characterization of dental implant surfaces, and to use it to characterize and establish the respective Identification (ID) Card and code of 62 implant surfaces available on the market. In this first part, the current version of the ISIS system and methodology is described and discussed.

 

Using standardized protocols of analysis and terminology, each osseointegrated implant surface can be defined using a standardized characterization code. First the ISIS codification system describes the surface chemical composition: the core material (titanium grades, zirconia, hydroxy-apatite) and the chemical modification (impregnation, coating, pollution). The system then defines the surface morphology (topography, structures) at the microscale (microroughness, micropores, microparticles) and nanoscale (nanoroughness, nanopatterning, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanosmooth), and its global architecture (homogeneity, cracks, fractal architecture).

 

This standardized characterization, classification and codification system allows to clarify the identity of each surface and to easily sort out their differences, to control implant production and to facilitate communication. Therefore it offers a global solution for the manufacturers, scientists, implant users, administrative authorities and the interactions of these 4 actors, and it could be suggested as the basis of an ISO standard in the future.Keywords. Dental implant, nanostructure, osseointegration, surface properties, titanium.

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Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 dental implant surfaces. Part 2: anodized and Titanium Plasma-Sprayed (TPS) surfaces (Group 1, metallurgy modification).

 

 

POSEIDO. 2014;2(1):23-35.

Background and objectives: Dental implants are commonly used in dental therapeutics, but dental practitioners only have limited information about the characteristics of the implant materials they take the responsibility to place in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 implant surfaces available on the market and establish their respective Identification (ID) Card, following the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS). In this second part, surfaces with metallurgy modification (anodization, titanium plasma-spraying TPS) were investigated.

 

Materials and Methods: Eight different implant surfaces were characterized: TiUnite (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden), Ospol (Ospol, Höllviken, Sweden), INNO (Cowellmedi Co., Busan, Korea), Shinhung M (Shinhung Co., Seoul, Korea), Tecom REP (Tecom Implantology/Titanmed, Galbiate, Italy), BioSpark (Keystone Dental, Burlington, MA, USA), Kohno HRPS (Sweden & Martina, Due Carrare, Italy), Kohno DES HRPS (Sweden & Martina, Due Carrare, Italy). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using XPS/ESCA (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy/Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) and the 100nm in-depth profile was established using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The microtopography was quantified using optical profilometry (OP). The general morphology and the nanotopography were evaluated using a Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the ISIS, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card.

 

Results: From a chemical standpoint, in the 8 different surfaces of this group, all were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 2 or 4), what appeared typical of surfaces produced through a modification of the core material metallurgy using anodization or titanium-plasma spraying. The 6 anodized surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation of the titanium core. Seven surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions. Only 1 surface presented no pollution. From a morphological standpoint, 5 surfaces were microporous (anodization) and 3 microrough, with different microtopographical aspects and values. Seven surfaces were smooth on the nanoscale, and therefore presented no significant and repetitive nanostructures. One implant was nanopatterned through a specific anodization process. Six implants presented various forms of cracks: three anodized implants had local cracks, while TiUnite and Kohno HRPS were covered with extended cracks all over the surface. Anodized surfaces could be considered as homogeneous, while TPS surfaces were heterogeneous (specificities of the production process). No surface was fractal.

 

Discussion and Conclusion: The ISIS systematic approach allowed to gather the main characteristics of these commercially available products in a clear and accurate ID card. The implants of the Group 1 have very specific morphological characteristics (frequent cracks and absence of nanotexture, specific microroughness or porosity), and users should be aware of these specificities if they decide to use these specific technologies.

 

Keywords: Dental implant, nanostructure, osseointegration, surface properties, titanium.

Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 dental implant surfaces. Part 3: sand-blasted/acid-etched (SLA type) and related surfaces (Group 2A, main subtractive process).

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Abstract

 

Background and objectives: Dental implants are commonly used in dental therapeutics, but dental practitioners only have limited information about the characteristics of the implant materials they take the responsibility to place in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 implant surfaces available on the market and establish their respective Identification (ID) Card, following the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS). In this third part, surfaces produced through the main subtractive process (sand-blasting/acid-etching, SLA-type and related) were investigated.

 

Materials and Methods: Eighteen different implant surfaces were characterized: Straumann SLA (ITI Straumann, Basel, Switzerland), Ankylos (Dentsply Friadent, Mannheim, Germany), Xive S (Dentsply Friadent, Mannheim, Germany), Frialit (Dentsply Friadent, Mannheim, Germany), Promote (Camlog, Basel, Switzerland), Dentium Superline (Dentium Co., Seoul, Korea), Osstem SA (Osstem implant Co., Busan, Korea), Genesio (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), Aadva (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), MIS Seven (MIS Implants Technologies, Bar Lev, Israel), ActivFluor (Blue Sky Bio, Grayslake, IL, USA), Tekka SA2 (Tekka, Brignais, France), Twinkon Ref (Tekka, Brignais, France), Bredent OCS blueSKY (Bredent Medical, Senden, Germany), Magitech MS2010 (Magitech M2I, Levallois-Perret, France), EVL Plus (SERF, Decines, France), Alpha Bio (Alpha Bio Tec Ltd, Petach Tikva, Israel), Neoporos (Neodent, Curitiba, Brazil). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using XPS/ESCA (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy/Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) and the 100nm in-depth profile was established using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The microtopography was quantified using optical profilometry (OP). The general morphology and the nanotopography were evaluated using a Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the ISIS, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card.

 

Results: From a chemical standpoint, in the 18 different surfaces of this group, 11 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 2 or 4) and 7 on a titanium-aluminium alloy (grade 5 or grade 23 ELI titanium). 4 surfaces presented some chemical impregnation of the titanium core, and 5 surfaces were covered with residual alumina blasting particles. 15 surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 2 presented a severe organic pollution overcoat. Only 3 surfaces presented no pollution (and also no chemical modification at all): GC Aadva, Genesio, MIS Seven. From a morphological standpoint, all surfaces were microrough, with different microtopographical aspects and values. All surfaces were nanosmooth, and therefore presented no significant and repetitive nanostructures. 14 surfaces were homogeneous and 4 heterogeneous. None of them was fractal.

 

Discussion and Conclusion: The ISIS systematic approach allowed to gather the main characteristics of these commercially available products in a clear and accurate ID card. The SLA-type surfaces have specific morphological characteristics (microrough, nanosmooth, with rare and in general accidental chemical modification) and are the most frequent surfaces used in the industry. However they present different designs, and pollutions are often detected (with blasting/etching residues particularly). Users should be aware of these specificities if they decide to use these products.

 

Keywords: Dental implant, nanostructure, osseointegration, surface properties, titanium.

Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 dental implant surfaces. Part 4: Resorbable Blasting Media (RBM), Dual Acid-Etched (DAE), Subtractive Impregnated Micro/Nanotextured (SIMN) and related surfaces (Group 2B, other subtractive process).

 

Abstract

 

Background and objectives: Dental implants are commonly used in dental therapeutics, but dental practitioners only have limited information about the characteristics of the implant materials they take the responsibility to place in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 implant surfaces available on the market and establish their respective Identification (ID) Card, following the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS). In this fourth part, surfaces produced through other subtractive processes (resorbable blasting media RBM, dual acid-etching DAE, subtractive impregnation micro/nanotexturization SIMN and others) were investigated.

 

Materials and Methods: Twenty different implant surfaces were characterized: MTX (Zimmer, Carlsbad, CA, USA), Biohorizons RBT (Biohorizons, Birmingham, AL, USA), OsseoFix (ADIN, Afula, Israel), Ossean (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, Florida, USA), Blossom Ossean (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, Florida, USA), Osstem RBM (Osstem implant Co., Busan, Korea), Ossean G23 ELI (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, Florida, USA), SBM body (Implant Direct LLC, Calabasas, CA, USA), MegaGen RBM (MegaGen Co., Seoul, Korea), DIO BioTite-M (DIO Corporation, Busan, Korea), Blue Sky Bio RBM (Blue Sky Bio, Grayslake, IL, USA), Anthogyr BCP (Anthogyr, Sallanches, France), Shinhung RBM+ (Shinhung Co., Seoul, Korea), Neobiotech CMI (Neobiotech Co., Seoul, Korea), Osseospeed (AstraTech, Mölndal, Sweden), 3I OsseoTite (Biomet 3I, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA), 3I OsseoTite 2 (Biomet 3I, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA), Neoss ProActive (Neoss Ltd, Harrogate, UK), BTI Interna (Biotechnology Institute, Vitoria, Spain), Winsix WMRS (BioSAF IN, Ancona, Italy). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using XPS/ESCA (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy/Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) and the 100nm in-depth profile was established using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The microtopography was quantified using optical profilometry (OP). The general morphology and the nanotopography were evaluated using a Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the ISIS, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card.

 

Results: From a chemical standpoint, in the 20 different surfaces of this group, 12 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 4) and 8 on a titanium-aluminium alloy (grade 5 or grade 23 ELI titanium). 16 surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation (most frequently with calcium phosphate CaP) and one surface presented a CaP particles discontinuous coating of the titanium core. 15 surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 4 presented a significant organic pollution overcoat. Only 5 surfaces presented no pollution (Osseospeed, Ossean, Blossom Osseans and Blue Sky Bio). From a morphological standpoint, all surfaces were microrough, with different microtopographical aspects and values. 16 surfaces were smooth on the nanoscale, and therefore presented no significant and repetitive nanostructures. Four implants only were nanorough (Osseospeed, Ossean, Blossom Osseans), following a SIMN production process. One surface (ProActive) was covered with extended cracks all over the surface. 17 surfaces were homogeneous and 3 heterogeneous. Only 3 surfaces were fractal.

 

Discussion and Conclusion: The ISIS systematic approach allowed to gather the main characteristics of these commercially available products in a clear and accurate ID card. The RBM surfaces have specific morphological characteristics (microrough, CaP impregnation) and are frequently used in the industry, and many other technologies exist. All these surfaces presented different designs, and pollutions were often detected. Users should be aware of these specificities if they decide to use these products. Finally, the SIMN surfaces appeared as an interesting evolution for the various subtractive technologies, to develop specific chemical modification, microtexture and nano texture.

Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 dental implant surfaces. Part 5: chemically coated surfaces (Group 3, coating) and implant collar surfaces (Group 4, collar).

 

Abstract

 

Background and objectives: Dental implants are commonly used in dental therapeutics, but dental practitioners only have limited information about the characteristics of the implant materials they take the responsibility to place in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 62 implant surfaces available on the market and establish their respective Identification (ID) Card, following the Implant Surface Identification Standard (ISIS). In this fifth part, coated surfaces and some collar surfaces were investigated.

 

Materials and Methods: Sixteen different implant surfaces were characterized: NanoTite (Biomet 3I, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA), SLActive (ITI Straumann, Basel, Switzerland), Roxolid SLActive (ITI Straumann, Basel, Switzerland), Xpeed (MegaGen Co., Seoul, Korea), Xpeed Plus (MegaGen Co., Seoul, Korea), Inicell (Thommen, Waldenburg, Switzerland), Integra-CP/NanoTite (Bicon, Boston, MA, USA), Dentis Haptite (Dentis, Daegu, Korea), Legacy 2 HA (Implant Direct LLC, Calabasas, CA, USA), Biohorizons HA (Biohorizons, Birmingham, AL, USA), Osstem HA (Osstem implant Co., Busan, Korea), DIO BioTite-H (DIO Co., Busan, Korea), Laser-Lok collar (Biohorizons, Birmingham, AL, USA), SBM collar (Implant Direct, Calabasas, CA, USA), Ossean collar (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, Florida, USA), Kohno DES ZirTi (Sweden & Martina, Due Carrare, Italy). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using XPS/ESCA (X-RayPhotoelectron Spectroscopy/Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) and the 100nm in-depth profile was established using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The microtopography was quantified using optical profilometry (OP). The general morphology and the nanotopography were evaluated using a Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the ISIS, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader- friendly ID card.

 

Results: From a chemical standpoint, in the 16 different surfaces of this group, 5 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 4), 4 on a titanium-aluminium alloy (grade 5 or 23), 1 on a titanium-zirconium alloy, 3 on hydroxyapatite, 1 on brushite and 2 on a calcium phosphate core. 13 surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation or discontinuous coating of the core material. 15 surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 1 presented also some organic pollution overcoat. Only 1 surface presented no pollution (Ossean collar). From a morphological standpoint, 1 surface was micropatterned (laser patterning) and 15 microrough, with different microtopographical aspects and values. 8 surfaces were smooth on the nanoscale, and therefore presented no significant and repetitive nanostructures. Eight surfaces were nanomodified: 2 implants were nanorough (Haptite and Ossean collar) and 6 were covered with nanoparticles (CaP, NaCl or Ca nanocrystals deposition: NanoTite, SLActive and Xpeed). Hydroxyapatite and brushite coated surfaces were heterogeneous and covered with extended cracks all over the surface. Only 6 surfaces were homogeneous and 10 were heterogeneous. Only one surface (Ossean collar) was fractal.

 

Discussion and Conclusion: The ISIS systematic approach allowed to gather the main characteristics of these commercially available products in a clear and accurate ID card. Coated surfaces had very specific morphological characteristics depending on the type of coating (nanocrystals heterogeneous deposition, or heterogeneous maximal microroughness with extended cracks for example). All these surfaces presented different designs, and pollutions were often detected. Users should be aware of these specificities if they decide to use these products. The development of new surfaces for the implant cervical area is also an important clinical paradigm users should be aware about. Finally, the diversity of the surfaces analyzed in this study illustrated that the ISIS system could be an interesting basis for the development of a clear and simple ISO standard for dental implant surfaces and other implantable devices.

Fractal patterns applied to implant surface: definitions and perspectives

 

 

J Oral Implantol. 2011 Oct;37(5):506-9. Epub 2011 Jun 13.

Abstract

 

Fractal patterns are frequently found in the Nature, but they are difficult to reproduce in artificial objects such as implantable materials. In this article, a definition of the concept of fractals for osseointegrated surfaces is suggested, based on the search for quasi self-similarity on at least 3 scales of investigation: microscale, nanoscale and atomic/crystal scale. Following this definition, the fractal dimension of some surfaces may be defined (illustrated here with Intra-Lock Ossean surface). However the biological effects of this architecture are still unknown and should be examined carefully in the future.

Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 dental implant surfaces.

 

 

Journal of Oral Implantology: October 2011, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 525-542. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/AAID-JOI-D-11-00080

Abstract

 

Dental implants are commonly used in daily practice, however most surgeons do not really know the characteristics of these biomedical devices they are placing in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 implant surfaces available on the market, and to establish a simple and clear identification (ID) card for all of them, following the classification procedure developed in the Dohan Ehrenfest et al. (2010) Codification (DEC) system.

 

Fourteen different implant surfaces were characterized:

1. TiUnite,

2. Ospol,

3. Kohno,

4. Osseospeed,

5. Ankylos,

6. MTX,

7. Promote,

8. BTI Interna,

9. EVL,

10. Twinkon,

11. Ossean,

12. NanoTite,

13. SLActive,

14. Integra-CP.

 

Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using XPS/ESCA and the 100nm in-depth profile was established using AES. The microtopography was quantified using light interferometry (IFM). The general morphology and the nanotopography were evaluated using a FESEM. Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the DEC, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card. Results: FROM A CHEMICAL STANDPOINT, in the 14 different surfaces, 10 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 2 or 4), 3 on a titanium-aluminium alloy (grade 5 titanium), and the last one on a calcium phosphate core.

 

9 surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation or discontinuous coating of the titanium core, and 3 surfaces were covered with residual alumina blasting particles. 12 surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 2 presented a severe organic pollution overcoat. Only 2 surfaces presented no pollution (Osseospeed and Ossean). FROM A MORPHOLOGICAL STANDPOINT, 2 surfaces were microporous (anodization) and 12 microrough, with different microtopographical aspects and values.

 

10 surfaces were smooth on the nanoscale, and therefore presented no significant and repetitive nanostructures. 4 implants were nanomodified: 2 implants were nanorough (Osseospeed and Ossean), and 2 were covered with nanoparticles (NanoTite and SLActive). TiUnite and Kohno HRPS were covered with extended cracks all over the surface. Only 8 surfaces could be considered as homogeneous.This systematic approach allowed to gather the main characteristics of these commercially available products in a single ID card.

 

Keywords: Dental implant, nanostructure, osseointegration, surface properties, titanium.

 

Keywords: Dental implant, nanostructure, osseointegration, surface properties, titanium.


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Publications 2015:

Treatment of Oral Mucosal Lesions by Scalpel Excision and Platelet-Rich Fibrin Membrane Grafting: A Review of 26 Sites.

Pathak H, Mohanty S, Urs AB, Dabas J.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2015 Mar 26
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25891657



The effect of platelet-rich fibrin on biologic characteristics of osteoblasts.

Sun XL, Zhou YM, Zhao JH, Zheng L, Yang TT.
Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 2015 Feb;24
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25858372

 

Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

Yuanzheng C, Yan G, Ting L, Yanjie F, Peng W, Nan B.
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2015 Jan 20
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25835246

 

Autologus Platelet Rich Fibrin aided Revascularization of an immature, non-vital permanent tooth with apical periodontitis: A case report.

Jadhav GR, Shah D, Raghvendra SS.
J Nat Sci Biol Med. 2015 Jan-Jun;6
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25810668    

 

Comparative clinical evaluation of coronally advanced flap with or without platelet rich fibrinmembrane in the treatment of isolated gingival recession.

Thamaraiselvan M, Elavarasu S, Thangakumaran S, Gadagi JS, Arthie T.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2015 Jan-Feb;19
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25810596

 

Clinical and radiographic evaluation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite with or without platelet-richfibrin membrane in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects.

Elgendy EA, Abo Shady TE.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2015 Jan-Feb
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25810595

 

Comparative evaluation of platelet-rich fibrin with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft in periodontal infrabony defects: A randomized controlled clinical study.

Shah M, Patel J, Dave D, Shah S.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2015 Jan-Feb;19
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25810594

 

In vitro evaluation of mechanical properties of platelet-rich fibrin membrane and scanning electron microscopic examination of its surface characteristics.

Sam G, Vadakkekuttical RJ, Amol NV.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2015 Jan-Feb;19
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25810590

 

Potential dental pulp revascularization and odonto-/osteogenic capacity of a novel transplant combined with dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin.

Chen YJ, Zhao YH, Zhao YJ, Liu NX, Lv X, Li Q, Chen FM, Zhang M.
Cell Tissue Res. 2015 Mar 24
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25797716

 

Novel use of platelet-rich fibrin matrix and MTA as an apical barrier in the management of a failed revascularization case.

Yadav P, Pruthi PJ, Naval RR, Talwar S, Verma M.
Dent Traumatol. 2015 Mar 19
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25787690

 

Platelet Rich Fibrin with 1% Metformin for the Treatment of Intrabony Defects in Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

Pradeep AR, Nagpal K, Karvekar S, Patnaik K, Naik SB Dr, Guruprasad CN.
J Periodontol. 2015 Mar 12:1-14
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25762357

 

Management of large preiapical lesion with the combination of second generation platelet extract and hydroxyapatite bone graft: a report of three cases.

E D, Kumar A, Tewari RK, Mishra SK, Iftekhar H.
J Clin Diagn Res. 2015 Jan;9
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25738094

 

Clinical evaluation of autologous platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of multiple adjacent gingival recession defects: a 12-month study.

Tunalι M, Özdemir H, Arabacι T, Gürbüzer B, Pikdöken L, Firatli E.
Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2015 Jan-Feb
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25734713

 

Evaluation of intrabony defects treated with platelet-rich fibrin or autogenous bone graft: A comparative analysis.

Mathur A, Bains VK, Gupta V, Jhingran R, Singh GP.
Eur J Dent. 2015 Jan-Mar;9
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25713492

 

Platelet-rich Concentrates Differentially Release Growth Factors and Induce Cell Migration In Vitro.

Schär MO, Diaz-Romero J, Kohl S, Zumstein MA, Nesic D.
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2015 May;473
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25690170

 

Revascularization of Immature, Nonvital Permanent Tooth Using Platelet-rich Fibrin in Children.

Nagaveni NB, Poornima P, Joshi JS, Pathak S, Nandini DB.
Pediatr Dent. 2015
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25685966

 

A comparative evaluation of the blood clot, platelet-rich plasma, and platelet-rich fibrin in regeneration of necrotic immature permanent teeth: A clinical study.

Narang I, Mittal N, Mishra N.
Contemp Clin Dent. 2015 Jan-Mar
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25684914

 

Micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analysis of the effects of platelet-rich fibrin on bone regeneration in the rabbit calvarium.

Acar AH, Yolcu Ü, Gül M, KeleĊŸ A, Erdem NF, Altundag Kahraman S.
Arch Oral Biol. 2015 Apr;60
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25621939

 

Management of an endo-perio lesion in an immature tooth using autologous platelet-rich fibrin: a case report.

Nagaveni NB, Kumari KN, Poornima P, Reddy V.
J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2015 Jan-Mar
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25572379

 

Effect of osteogenic periosteal distraction by a modified Hyrax device with and without platelet-rich fibrin on bone formation in a rabbit model: A pilot study.

Pripatnanont P, Balabid F, Pongpanich S, Vongvatcharanon S.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2015 May
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25563525

 

Influence of the association between platelet-rich fibrin and bovine bone on bone regeneration. A histomorphometric study in the calvaria of rats.

Oliveira MR, deC Silva A, Ferreira S, Avelino CC, Garcia IR Jr, Mariano RC.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2015 May
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25553712

 

Evaluation of osteoblastic activity in extraction sockets treated with platelet-rich fibrin.

Baslarli O, Tumer C, Ugur O, Vatankulu B.
Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2015 Jan 1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25475771

 

The heat-compression technique for the conversion of platelet-rich fibrin preparation to a barrier membrane with a reduced rate of biodegradation.

Kawase T, Kamiya M, Kobayashi M, Tanaka T, Okuda K, Wolff LF, Yoshie H.
J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater. 2015 May
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25132655

 

The combination use of platelet-rich fibrin and treated dentin matrix for tooth root regeneration by cell homing.

Ji B, Sheng L, Chen G, Guo S, Xie L, Yang B, Guo W, Tian W.
Tissue Eng Part A. 2015 Jan;21
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25111570


 2014:

The heat-compression technique for the conversion of platelet-rich fibrin preparation to a barrier membrane with a reduced rate of biodegradation.

Kawase T, Kamiya M, Kobayashi M, Tanaka T, Okuda K, Wolff LF, Yoshie H.
J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater. 2014 Aug
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25132655

 

Leucocyte-rich and platelet-rich fibrin for the treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: a prospective feasibility study.

Kim JW, Kim SJ, Kim MR
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Aug 16.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25138613

 

Additive effect of autologous platelet concentrates in treatment of intrabony defects: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Panda S1, Doraiswamy J, Malaiappan S, Varghese SS, Del Fabbro M.
J Investig Clin Dent. 2014 Jul 22.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25048153

 

Treatment of Refractory Apical Peri-implantitis: A Case Report.

Kutlu HB1, Genc T, Tozum TF.
J Oral Implantol. 2014 Aug 8
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25105584

 

Platelet-Rich Preparations to Improve Healing. Part II: Platelet Activation and Enrichment, Leukocyte Inclusion, and Other Selection Criteria.

Davis VL1, Abukabda AB, Radio NM, Witt-Enderby PA, Clafshenkel WP, Cairone JV, Rutkowski JL.
J Oral Implantol. 2014 Aug;40(4):511-21
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25106017

 

The Combination Use of Platelet-Rich Fibrin and Treated Dentin Matrix for Tooth Root Regeneration by Cell Homing.

Ji B1, Sheng L, Chen G, Guo S, Xie L, Yang B, Guo W, Tian W.
Tissue Eng Part A. 2014 Aug 11
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25111570

 

Advanced Platelet-Rich Fibrin (A-PRF) - A new concept for cell-based tissue engineering by means of inflammatory cells.

Ghanaati S1, Booms P, Orlowska A, Kubesch A, Lorenz J, Rutkowski J, Landes C, Sader R, Kirkpatrick C, Choukroun J.

J Oral Implantol. 2014 Jun 19. [Epub ahead of print]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24945603

 

Effect of platelet-rich fibrin on frequency of alveolar osteitis following mandibular third molar surgery: a double-blinded randomized clinical trial.

Eshghpour M1, Dastmalchi P2, Nekooei AH3, Nejat A4.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Aug;72(8):1463-7. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2014.03.029. Epub 2014 Apr 5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25037182

 

Direct implantation versus platelet-rich fibrin-embedded adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in treating rat acute myocardial infarction.

Sun CK1, Zhen YY2, Leu S3, Tsai TH2, Chang LT4, Sheu JJ5, Chen YL2, Chua S2, Chai HT2, Lu HI5, Chang HW6, Lee FY5, Yip HK7.
Int J Cardiol. 2014 May
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24685001

 

Platelet rich fibrin and alloplast in the treatment of intrabony defect.

Panda S1, Ramamoorthi S2, Jayakumar ND1, Sankari M1, Varghese SS1.
J Pharm Bioallied Sci. 2014 Apr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24741282

 

Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using cortical bone pins in combination with leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF).

Toffler M.
Compend Contin Educ Dent. 2014 Mar;35(3):192-8.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24773199

 

Use of Platelet-rich fibrin as an autologous biologic rejuvenating media for avulsed teeth - an in vitro study.

Hiremath H1, Kulkarni S, Sharma R, Hiremath V, Motiwala T.
Dent Traumatol. 2014Jun 13. doi: 10.1111/edt.12119.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24924343

 

Effect of autologous platelet rich fibrin on the healing of experimental articular cartilage defects of the knee in an animal model.

Kazemi D1, Fakhrjou A2, Mirzazadeh Dizaji V3, Khanzadeh Alishahi M3.
Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:486436.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25028656

 

Lyophilized platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) promotes craniofacial bone regeneration through Runx2.

Li Q1, Reed DA2, Min L3, Gopinathan G4, Li S5, Dangaria SJ6, Li L7, Geng Y8, Galang MT9, Gajendrareddy P10, Zhou Y11, Luan X12, Diekwisch TG13.
Int J Mol Sci. 2014 May 14;15(5):8509-25. doi: 10.3390/ijms15058509.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24830554

 

Platelet-rich fibrin as an adjunct to palatal wound healing after harvesting a free gingival graft: A case series.

Kulkarni MR1, Thomas BS1, Varghese JM1, Bhat GS2.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2014 May;18(3):399-402.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25024559

 

Improvement in the repair of defects in maxillofacial soft tissue in irradiated minipigs by a mixture of adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin.

Chen Y1, Niu Z2, Xue Y3, Yuan F4, Fu Y1, Bai N5.
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Jun 30
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24993354

 

Management of radicular cysts using platelet-rich fibrin and bioactive glass: A report of two cases.

Zhao JH1, Tsai CH2, Chang YC3.
J Formos Med Assoc. 2014 Jul;
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24961190

 

Platelet-rich fibrin has a healing effect on chemotherapy-induced mucositis in hamsters.

Horii K, Kanayama T, Miyamoto H, Kohgo T, Tsuchimochi T, Shigetomi T, Yokoi M.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2014 Apr;117(4):445-53.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24485786 

 

Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels.

Textor JA1, Murphy KC, Leach JK, Tablin F.
Am J Vet Res. 2014 Apr;75(4):392-401.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24669926

 

Direct implantation versus platelet-rich fibrin-embedded adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in treating rat acute myocardial infarction.

Sun CK, Zhen YY, Leu S, Tsai TH, Chang LT, Sheu JJ, Chen YL, Chua S, Chai HT, Lu HI, Chang HW, Lee FY, Yip HK.
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 14. pii: S0167-5273(14)00440-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.03.015. [Epub ahead of print]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24685001

 

Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization: novel technique for preserving the ruptured ACL.

Eggli S1, Kohlhof H, Zumstein M, Henle P, Hartel M, Evangelopoulos DS, Bonel H, Kohl S.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2014 Mar 21. [Epub ahead of print]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24651979

 

Properties of biologic scaffolds and their response to mesenchymal stem cells.

Beitzel , McCarthy, Cote, Russell, Apostolakos, Ramos, Kumbar, Imhoff, Arciero, Mazzocca
Arthroscopy. 2014 Mar;30(3):289-98. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2013.11.020.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24581253

 

Comparison of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), and concentrated growth factor (CGF) in rabbit-skull defect healing.

Kim TH1, Kim SH1, Sándor GK2, Kim YD3.
Arch Oral Biol. 2014 May;59(5):550-8.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24667430

 

Buccal bone deficiency in fresh extraction sockets: a prospective single cohort study.

Barone A1, Ricci M, Romanos GE, Tonelli P, Alfonsi F, Covani U.
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2014 Mar 31.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24684275

 

Maxillary sinus grafting with a synthetic, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite-silica gel in humans: histologic and histomorphometric results.

Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2014 Mar-Apr;34(2):259-67. doi: 10.11607/prd.1419.
Bosshardt DD, Bornstein MM, Carrel JP, Buser D, Bernard JP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24600662

 

Autologous platelet rich fibrin glue for sealing of low-output enterocutaneous fistulas: An observational cohort study.

Wu X1, Ren J2, Gu G1, Wang G1, Han G3, Zhou B1, Ren H1, Yao M4, Driver VR4, Li J1.
Surgery. 2014 Mar;155(3):434-41.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24183344

 

The bone integration effects of platelet-rich fibrin by removal torque of titanium screw in rabbit tibia.

Cho SA, Lee BK, Park SH, Ahn JJ.
Platelets. 2014 Jan 16.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24433149

 

Effect of platelet rich fibrin and beta tricalcium phosphate on bone healing. A histological study in pigs.

Yilmaz D, Dogan N, Ozkan A, Sencimen M, Ora BE, Mutlu I.

Acta Cir Bras. 2014 Jan
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24474179

 

Lateral sliding bridge flap technique along with platelet rich fibrin and guided tissue regeneration for root coverage.

Agarwal K, Chandra C, Agarwal K, Kumar N.
J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2013 Nov;17(6):801-805.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24554895

 

An innovative approach in the management of palatogingival groove using Biodentine™ and platelet-rich fibrin membrane.

Johns DA, Shivashankar VY, Shobha K, Johns M.
J Conserv Dent. 2014 Jan;17(1):75-79.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24554867

 

The influence of platelet-rich fibrin on angiogenesis in guided bone regeneration using xenogenic bone substitutes: A study of rabbit cranial defects.

Yoon JS1, Lee SH1, Yoon HJ2.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2014 Jan 15.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24530076

 

Management of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with a platelet-rich fibrin membrane: technical report.

Soydan SS, Uckan S.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Feb;
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24075235

 

Clinical effectiveness of combining platelet rich fibrin with alloplastic bone substitute for the management of combined endodontic periodontal lesion.

Goyal L.
Restor Dent Endod. 2014 Feb
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24516830

 

Platelet rich fibrin - a novel acumen into regenerative endodontic therapy.

Hotwani K1, Sharma K2.
Restor Dent Endod. 2014 Feb;39(1):1-6.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24516822

 

Simultaneous sinus lift and implantation using platelet-rich fibrin as sole grafting material.

Jeong SM, Lee CU, Son JS, Oh JH, Fang Y, Choi BH.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2014 Jan 14.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24503388

 

Increased vascularization during early healing after biologic augmentation in repair of chronic rotator cuff tears using autologous leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF): a prospective randomized controlled pilot trial

Zumstein MA, Rumian A, Lesbats V, Schaer M, Boileau P.
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2014 Jan;23(1):3-12. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2013.08.017.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24331121

 

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